Wednesday, January 22, 2020

Mouthfeel – Wordplay Wednesday™ 01/22/2020


Recipe for a Textured Memorable Experience 

I found this week’s Wordplay Wednesday a few weeks before the passing of a dear friend, not knowing when I would use it. Now is the perfect time … and timing is everything.

Best friend, mentor, and author, John F. Harnish was a sensory person long before he became my “older brother from another mother.” We spoke daily for probably half of the fifteen years I knew him, about everything under the sun. His irreverent and sardonic wit and wisdom, coupled with loyalty and warmth, made me a better person.

The past few years, however, he battled a second round of cancer that he could not conquer and passed Earth’s threshold on Monday, January 13, 2020. In recent months, he reminded me of the personal pleasures in life we likely don’t think about every day.
 
Dedicated to a friend who learned the hard way how to enjoy his food with …

MOUTHFEEL (mouthʹfēlʹ’) n. – the way a particular food or beverage feels in the mouth as it is eaten or drunk (the velvety mouthfeel of ice cream). [WW #252*]

A side effect of John’s treatment was loss of taste and mouthfeel. Yep, those tiny tasty buds on our tongues are not impervious to the ravages of modern medicine. He lamented not being able to taste or feel the texture of chocolate or food in general. Eating became a meaningless chore.

When he related the tales of his less-than-tasty hospital food, I occasionally asked if he could taste it yet, always hoping for a resounding yes. Eventually to his delight, the mouthfeel of foods returned, however, “No, I still can’t taste it, but I can feel it and remember the taste.” He always looked for a silver lining.

So, is it your birthday today or this week? Don’t forget the cake and ice cream! Even if spending your day alone, a cupcake (with candle, or course) and a pint of the cold creamy stuff is a must. Rather than scarfing it down like prior years, take a few extra moments and delight in the mouthfeel of every bite. Envision tidbits of birthdays past, as you unwrap the gift of taste and memories.

We all know foods that give us a smile just thinking about our next indulgence. If your birthday is another time of year, today, treat yourself anyway. You deserve it. Make a favorite dish for your next meal, invite a special friend, and together, savor the mouthfeel while making a new memory of tasteful joy.

Great chefs … and John … would agree, it isn’t just the flavor of a certain food that tingles your senses; it’s combined with the texture and sensory experience of its mouthfeel. Happy Birthday or bon appétit!

Word Challenge: MOUTHFEEL. Truly think about your food as you take a bite, and fit mouthfeel into your week of tasty writings.

Learning knows no prejudices or boundaries, and it isn’t fattening! Expanding your mind is a no-cost, simple joy. Do you feel that way too? What’s your inspiration? Share your creative genius and Wordplay Wednesday comments below.

Write first for yourself … only then can you write for others. (L.Rochelle) 


[LinDee Rochelle is a writer and editor by trade, and an author by way of Rock & Roll. She has published two books in her Blast from Your Past series (of three) about pioneering R&R Radio DJs. True behind-the-mic tales make GREAT Holiday and anytime Gifts available on Amazon (eBook and print): Book 1Rock & Roll Radio DJs: The First Five Years 1954-1959; and Book 2Rock & Roll Radio DJs: The Swinging Sixties. Coming soon … The Psychedelic Seventies!]

*Note: Dictionary definitions are quoted from Webster’s New World College Dictionary. Yes, we sometimes present them out of “official” context—but that’s half the fun! Think of it as “creative context.”
Endnote: FYI – All links in the PFP site are personally visited, verified, and vetted. Most are linked to commonly accessed sites of reputable note. However, as with everything cyber-security, use at your own discretion.

E-N-Dzzzzzzzz  

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

Sylvan – Wordplay Wednesday™ 01/15/2020


Let’s Get Back to Nature … 

It’s generally agreed that at ease with yourself is foremost before you will find comfort with others. Some take that to the extreme and rarely feel the need for communal contact, like a …

SYLVAN (silʹvɘn) n. – one who lives in the woods; adj. – 1) of or characteristic of the woods or forest; 2) living or found in the woods or forest; 3) wooded. [WW #251*]

Let me guess … you’re thinking of a sylvan fairy sprite or wood nymph (dryad) or some such creature … let me stretch your imagination to reality … think of forest rangers!

I happen to know one very well, and yes, she spent periodic months and years as a sylvan to fulfill part of her early training. It takes dedication and faith in self, to staff a solitary forestry lookout.

Though no longer a sylvan, after a career moving up through the ranks of the U.S. Forest Service, this pioneering female firefighter now consults for the talking heads in Washington D.C.

In a world struggling to control wildfires, her rugged firefighting experience and insights as a sylvan, are useful to lawmakers. She provides perceptive guidance in forest preservation and assistance to understand the benefits of implementing advanced firefighting techniques, well before an emergency arises.
 
Sylvans can be firefighting heroes, or beings simply at peace in their environment to enjoy the benefits of living in Mother Nature’s woodland.** It is better to try to work with, rather than against, Mother Nature. (Unknown)

According to the dictionary, sylvans are recognized in France as a forest deity; and in Germany, it translates simply to xylong—wood.

Word Challenge: SYLVAN. Do you have a sylvan in your life? Do you want to be one? Consider their fascination with nature, as you fit sylvan into your week of woodland writings.
 
**Literary note of warning: I have a penchant for not overusing a word in any given page of writing. While composing, I often utilize Microsoft Word’s “Synonyms” feature—many of you likely do, as well. However, out of curiosity, I looked up two of the words that MS provided as a synonym for “woodland” when I wanted to use something else. MS provided COPPICE and COPSE. Meaning the same thing, copse is the preferred word in the dictionary for “a thicket of small trees or shrubs”—hardly a true synonym for woodland, “land covered with woods or trees; forest.” Word of caution when writing in Word … if MS offers a word you’re not familiar with as a synonym, look it up. It may not have the connotation you truly mean to convey.

Learning knows no prejudices or boundaries, and it isn’t fattening! Expanding your mind is a no-cost, simple joy. Do you feel that way too? What’s your inspiration? Share your creative genius and Wordplay Wednesday comments below.

Write first for yourself … only then can you write for others. (L.Rochelle) 


[LinDee Rochelle is a writer and editor by trade, and an author by way of Rock & Roll. She has published two books in her Blast from Your Past series (of three) about pioneering R&R Radio DJs. True behind-the-mic tales make GREAT Holiday and anytime Gifts available on Amazon (eBook and print): Book 1Rock & Roll Radio DJs: The First Five Years 1954-1959; and Book 2Rock & Roll Radio DJs: The Swinging Sixties. Coming soon … The Psychedelic Seventies!]

*Note: Dictionary definitions are quoted from Webster’s New World College Dictionary. Yes, we sometimes present them out of “official” context—but that’s half the fun! Think of it as “creative context.”
Endnote: FYI – All links in the PFP site are personally visited, verified, and vetted. Most are linked to commonly accessed sites of reputable note. However, as with everything cyber-security, use at your own discretion.

E-N-Dzzzzzzzz